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Integrative health at University Hospitals receives "game-changing" gift from Sara and Chris Connor (VIDEO/AUDIO)




CLEVELAND --  "This gift is game-changing for us," says Francoise Adan, MD, Medical Director of the University Hospitals Connor Integrative Health Network. "That's why we're so incredibly thankful to Chris and Sara."

Former Sherwin-Williams CEO Chris Connor and his wife Sara have given the Connor Integrative Health Network $6.5 million, which, in addition to their earlier gift of $2 million, brings their total commitment to integrative health to $8.5 million.

"Integrative medicine is the blending of both worlds," says Dr. Adan. Integrative medicine supplements traditional medicine like surgery and pharmacology with evidence-based integrative practices like acupuncture, massage, yoga and mindfulness.

Dr. Adan says the Connor gift is a strong endorsement for these practices. "It shows integrative medicine is here to stay."


Neurosurgeon Andrew Sloan on John McCain's Hospitalization from Brain Cancer Treatment (INTERVIEW)




CLEVELAND -- "There are sometimes side effects," says Andrew Sloan, MD, a neurosurgeon at University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center about Senator John McCain's recent hospitalization. Dr. Sloan says the standard treatment for glioblastoma is radiation to the brain and a low-dose chemotherapy and then six cycles of chemotherapy. "I wouldn't be super alarmed; we'll just have to see what's going on."

Dr. Sloan says glioblastoma, the most common primary malignant tumor of the brain, has a median survival expectancy of a year-and-a-half after diagnosis but Dr. Sloan says John McCain has things working in his favor, including the fact he seems to be in good shape and is a fighter.


Surgical Theater Initiative Marries New Technology with Old Fashion Bedside Care (VIDEO/AUDIO)




CLEVELAND -- When former Major League pitcher Tom Norton needed brain surgery, neurosurgeons explained the procedure by taking a flight around his brain using the 3D rehearsal platform Surgical Theater.

"He actually showed me on the computer the tumor in there and how they're going about to do in there," says the 67-year-old Norton, who was losing vision in his left eye because of the brain tumor pressing on his optic nerve.

Developed by UH neurosurgeon Warren Selman and two former Israeli Air Force pilots, Moty Avisar and Alon Geri, Surgical Theater is a flight simulator for brain surgery, a sort of video game that allows doctors to rehearse the procedure before doing it.

A "Back to Bedside Initiative" grant puts Surgical Theater technology in the hands of the patient, or around their head, showing them exactly what doctors will do, easing fears they might have.

"I think it does help a lot of people in terms of giving the ability to kind of conceptualize more of what the problem is," says James Wright, MD, a fifth year neurosurgery resident at University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center. "I think just having that bit of understanding probably does alleviate some anxiety."

For Tom Norton, that gives him extra confidence come game time.

"I'm feeling a little more relaxed," the Sheffield Lake, Ohio resident and former Minnesota Twin says about his surgery.


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