News Releases

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center receives verification for Level I trauma center

CLEVELAND – The Level I trauma center at University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center has received verification from the American College of Surgeons (ACS), the organization that establishes criteria ensuring trauma care capability and institutional performance.
 
The Level I trauma center opened late in 2015 and has been operating under provisional status, as is customary until the ACS could conduct its extensive review of the program earlier this year and issue its final verification, which was in May.
 
“Obtaining a Level I verification status indicates the institution’s capability of providing comprehensive care for every aspect of injury,” said Nathaniel McQuay, MD, Director of Trauma Services and Acute-Care Surgery at UH Cleveland Medical Center. “Level I trauma centers also have a major responsibility for providing leadership in education, research, and system planning thereby ensuring the continuing presence of adequate resources in order to provide efficient, high level care for the management of time sensitive injuries.”


Tuesday, June 27, 2017

NICU best in Ohio according to U.S. News & World Report Rankings for University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital

CLEVELAND – University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital (UH Rainbow) once again earned high recognition in U.S. News & World Report’s Best Children’s Hospitals annual rankings. UH Rainbow is ranked No. 7 in neonatology, and among the nation’s 20 best children’s hospitals in orthopedics, neurology & neurosurgery, and pulmonology.
 
“We are honored U.S. News & World Report has recognized the outstanding work of our physicians, nurses and staff," says Fred Rothstein, MD, Interim Chair, Department of Pediatrics at UH Rainbow. “We have exceptional people who are passionate about caring for babies, children and young adults, and producing the very best outcomes for the patients and their families who come to us for their care.”


Thursday, June 22, 2017

Cleveland researchers call for paradigm shift in type 2 diabetes treatment

CLEVELAND – Heart disease is a leading cause of death worldwide and exacerbated by type 2 diabetes, yet diabetes treatment regimens tend to focus primarily on blood sugar maintenance. This common approach to type 2 diabetes management can leave patients at risk for heart attack and stroke. But results from four recent randomized clinical trials suggest that using medications that offer glucose control while reducing the risk for cardiovascular disease could improve patient outcomes.
 
"Strong evidence provided by the four recent trials published within the past 1.5 to 2 years in the New England Journal of Medicine has shown that some of the modern available therapeutic agents that control blood glucose also help reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease," said Faramarz Ismail-Beigi, MD, PhD, Professor of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University and Endocrinologist at University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center and Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center. "Based on this evidence, we propose that we must shift from our previous paradigm with its monocular focus on control of blood glucose and hemoglobin A1c, to one of control of blood glucose plus preventing cardiovascular disease and death from cardiovascular causes." Hemoglobin A1c is a common test used to determine a patient's average blood sugar levels over the previous 2-3 months.


Wednesday, June 07, 2017

Harrington Discovery Institute announces Gund-Harrington Scholars

CLEVELAND – Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals in Cleveland, Ohio part of The Harrington Project for Discovery & Development, and the Foundation Fighting Blindness have announced their 2017 Gund-Harrington Scholars.
 
Harrington Discovery Institute partnerships are based on a shared mission to advance discoveries of new medicines that will improve human health, as well as, enhance each organization's ability to play a significant role in setting the scientific and innovation agenda in leading-edge research. These awards offer selected winners funding and drug development expertise to ensure the most promising treatments enter clinical trials where their safety and efficacy can be established.
 


Friday, June 02, 2017

Small molecule prevents blood clots without increasing bleeding risk

CLEVELAND – It may be possible to disrupt harmful blood clots in people at risk for heart attack or stroke without increasing their risk of bleeding, according to a new study published in Nature Communications.

The new research out of University Hospitals (UH) Cleveland Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and the Cleveland Clinic reveals a previously unknown cell receptor interaction that, when manipulated with therapeutic molecules, safely prevents blood clots. Approximately 100,000 Americans die annually from blood clots, or thrombosis, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“We have found a new thrombosis target that does not increase bleeding risk,” said senior author Daniel I. Simon, MD, President, UH Cleveland Medical Center, Herman K. Hellerstein Chair of Cardiovascular Research, and Professor of Medicine at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine. “Our discovery indicates that you can identify a new pathway and target that mediates blood clotting, but does not affect our body’s natural processes to stop bleeding, called hemostasis.”



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