News Releases

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Shape of inner ear helps predict hearing loss for children with rare hearing loss disorder

CLEVELAND — It may be possible to predict the severity of hearing loss for children diagnosed with enlarged vestibular aqueduct, according to a new study published in JAMA-Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. This retrospective chart review, authored by physicians and researchers within the University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children’s Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct (EVA) Research Project, is one of the first such studies to find a direct connection between the increasing width of the vestibular aqueduct and the degree of hearing loss a child experiences over time.

“There is still much to learn about the true causes and impacts of EVA,” says Mustafa Ascha, MS, first author of the study and a researcher within the UH Rainbow Department of Otolaryngology. “The hope is that these findings will help parents of young children with EVA, and their physicians, better understand what lies ahead for their child’s hearing and speech based on the severity of that child’s malformation.”


Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Nursing Collaborative tackles impending nursing shortages, enhances workforce development for Northeast Ohio

CLEVELAND — A collaboration between University Hospitals (UH), Cleveland State University (CSU), and Cuyahoga Community College (Tri-C) will establish a comprehensive workforce development pathway to increase the numbers of registered nurses, and increase the number who earn a baccalaureate degree, in nursing (BSN). The goal of the collaboration is to proactively address the impending shortage of nurses in Northeast Ohio.

The unique collaboration between a health system, a university and a community college will better meet the needs of students, employers and the community, and will serve as a model for other communities around the United States who face similar challenges. 


Tuesday, March 14, 2017

International Harrington Prize in Medicine jointly awarded to three recipients

CLEVELAND – The fourth annual Harrington Prize for Innovation in Medicine has been jointly awarded to Daniel J. Drucker, MD (Mount Sinai Hospital, Canada), Joel F. Habener, MD (Massachusetts General Hospital, USA) and Jens J. Holst, MD, DMSc (University of Copenhagen, Denmark) for their discovery of incretin hormones and for the translation of these findings into transformative therapies for major metabolic diseases such as diabetes.
 
The Harrington Prize for Innovation in Medicine, established in 2014 by the Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals (UH) in Cleveland, Ohio and The American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI), honors physician-scientists who have moved science forward with achievements notable for innovation, creativity and potential for clinical application.
 
Drs. Habener and Holst are recognized for their discovery of the hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and Dr. Drucker for translating the discovery into breakthrough treatments for diabetes.  The work of these three investigators, and Drucker in particular, has also resulted in the discovery and clinical development of glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) for intestinal disorders (short bowel syndrome).  

“The work by this trio of investigators that spans the full spectrum from discovery to clinical impact is exemplary,” said Vivian Cheung, MD, Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Professor of Medicine at the University of Michigan, and 2016-2017 President of the ASCI. “This is precisely the type of bench-to-bedside advancements that The Harrington Prize seeks to recognize.”
 
A committee composed of members of the ASCI Council and the Harrington Discovery Institute Scientific Advisory Board reviewed 58 nominations from 49 institutions and five countries before selecting the 2017 recipients.
 
“We are pleased to join with the ASCI to honor Drs. Drucker, Habener and Holst for their contributions to medicine,” said Jonathan Stamler, MD, President of the Harrington Discovery Institute and the Robert S. and Sylvia K. Reitman Distinguished Chair in Cardiovascular Innovation at UH Cleveland Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. “This remarkable trio exemplifies the best in medicine – from fundamental discovery through to breakthrough drugs in the clinic that impact the lives of millions of people around the world.”
 
In addition to sharing a $20,000 honorarium, Drs. Holst, Habener, and Drucker will jointly deliver The Harrington Prize Lecture at the 2017 Association of American Physicians/ASCI/American Physician Scientists Association Joint Meeting on April 21, and publish an essay in The Journal of Clinical Investigation.  
 
Dr. Drucker received his MD from the University of Toronto in 1980, is cu


Monday, March 13, 2017

University Hospitals named a 2017 World’s Most Ethical Company by the Ethisphere Institute

CLEVELAND – University Hospitals (UH) has been recognized by the Ethisphere Institute, the global leader in defining and advancing the standards of ethical business practices, as a 2017 World’s Most Ethical Company®.
 
UH has received this designation five times since 2012, and is one of only seven health care providers recognized this year. The award underscores an ongoing institutional commitment to continually raise the bar on ethical leadership and behavior throughout the organization.
 
“The recognition is a tribute to the culture of integrity that defines University Hospitals and the care we provide to the people of Northeast Ohio,” said Thomas F. Zenty III, Chief Executive Officer of University Hospitals. “As this honor continues to grow in prominence, we hope more organizations worldwide recognize that high ethical standards are fundamental to success.”


Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Ohio’s first fetal heart procedure performed at UH Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital

CLEVELAND – A mother and her 29-week-old unborn child are doing well after a team of physicians performed a successful in utero procedure at University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital (UH Rainbow) last week. Known as fetal aortic valvuloplasty, this is the first heart procedure done before birth in Ohio.
 
This rare approach helps prevent the progression of hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) in about half of all treated patients. Babies born with HLHS are sometimes referred to as having half a heart, because the left chambers of the heart are too small to pump blood to the body. The minimally invasive procedure may make the baby healthier and more stable at birth and may decrease the number of open-heart surgeries for the child later in life. 
 
“Right now, mom and baby are doing well, and we noted improvement in the way the blood flows through the heart prior to mom’s discharge,” says James Strainic, MD, Director, Fetal Heart Program at UH Rainbow.



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