News Releases

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Takeda and Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals announce collaboration to advance the development of rare disease therapeutics

Osaka, Japan and Cleveland, Ohio, USA – Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited (TSE: 4502), and Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals in Cleveland, Ohio have announced a multi-year collaboration to accelerate breakthrough therapeutic discoveries in rare diseases.
 
A first of a kind partnership for Harrington Discovery Institute with a major pharmaceutical company, this collaboration with Takeda will build on Harrington Discovery Institute’s established operating model to create a new program specifically for the advancement of medicines for rare diseases. At the same time, this collaboration will complement Takeda’s strategic R&D focus in its therapeutic areas of oncology, gastroenterology and central nervous system disorders. The Harrington program will focus on M.D. and Ph.D. researchers from across the United States, developing disruptive and transformative research, which shows promise for translation into novel treatments.
 
“Takeda is committed to supporting and developing transformative therapies for social benefit – so are we,” said Jonathan S. Stamler, MD, President, Harrington Discovery Institute and the Robert S. and Sylvia K. Reitman Family Foundation Distinguished Chair in Cardiovascular Innovation at University Hospitals and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. “We are delighted to see Takeda’s confidence in us to advance early stage discoveries in a major area of unmet medical need. Through this partnering model that bridges academia and industry, we will jointly leverage our financial and human capital to accelerate the pace of cures for rare diseases.”


Wednesday, April 05, 2017

UH Seidman Cancer Center’s Five Star Sensation Shines Culinary Spotlight on Cleveland

CLEVELAND — Cleveland’s most celebrated benefit--Five Star Sensation--features over 80 acclaimed chefs and vintners from around the world. Michael Symon, renowned Iron Chef and co-host of ABC’s The Chew, leads this year’s Five Star Sensation as the event’s Host Chef.
 
Five Star Sensation, Northeast Ohio’s premier food and wine event, has raised more than $18 million for University Hospitals (UH) Seidman Cancer Center since the event began in 1987. Tickets are now available for this extraordinary celebration of food and wine to be held Saturday, June 24, at Cuyahoga Community College in Highland Hills, OH. The evening includes live music, dancing, a silent auction, wine pull and more.
 
This marks Symon’s second time as Host Chef. A Cleveland native with acclaimed restaurants Lola and Mabel’s BBQ in Cleveland, Roast in Detroit and several locations of B Spot Burgers throughout the Midwest, Symon is renowned in the culinary world. “I am thrilled to participate in this culinary extravaganza in my hometown benefiting University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center,” said Symon. “It raises vital funds for such an important cause in our community, and I’m honored to have the opportunity to continue to serve as Host Chef of this truly sensational evening.”


Wednesday, March 29, 2017

University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center physicians part of groundbreaking research of first report of quadriplegic man moving arm through brain-controlled muscle stimulation

CLEVELAND – A neurologist and two neurosurgeons from University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center played vital roles in a new study reporting the first successful case in the world of a man with quadriplegia moving his paralyzed right arm through brain-controlled muscle stimulation.  
 
Using an implanted brain sensor array and muscle stimulators, the 56-year-old man, Bill Kochevar, who had a complete traumatic high spinal cord injury from a bicycle accident, was able to extend his arm, grasp a cup and bring it to his mouth.  In other tests, he was able to feed himself using a fork.
 
The major, multi-institutional study appears in the March 28 issue of the journal The Lancet. UH Neurological Institute physicians were part of the research team: Benjamin Walter, MD, Director of the UH Movement Disorders Program and the Clinical Principal Investigator for the study in Cleveland; Jonathan Miller, MD, Director of the Functional and Restorative Neurosurgery Center and lead surgeon, and neurosurgeon Jennifer Sweet, MD.


Thursday, March 23, 2017

Shape of inner ear helps predict hearing loss for children with rare hearing loss disorder

CLEVELAND — It may be possible to predict the severity of hearing loss for children diagnosed with enlarged vestibular aqueduct, according to a new study published in JAMA-Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. This retrospective chart review, authored by physicians and researchers within the University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children’s Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct (EVA) Research Project, is one of the first such studies to find a direct connection between the increasing width of the vestibular aqueduct and the degree of hearing loss a child experiences over time.

“There is still much to learn about the true causes and impacts of EVA,” says Mustafa Ascha, MS, first author of the study and a researcher within the UH Rainbow Department of Otolaryngology. “The hope is that these findings will help parents of young children with EVA, and their physicians, better understand what lies ahead for their child’s hearing and speech based on the severity of that child’s malformation.”


Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Nursing Collaborative tackles impending nursing shortages, enhances workforce development for Northeast Ohio

CLEVELAND — A collaboration between University Hospitals (UH), Cleveland State University (CSU), and Cuyahoga Community College (Tri-C) will establish a comprehensive workforce development pathway to increase the numbers of registered nurses, and increase the number who earn a baccalaureate degree, in nursing (BSN). The goal of the collaboration is to proactively address the impending shortage of nurses in Northeast Ohio.

The unique collaboration between a health system, a university and a community college will better meet the needs of students, employers and the community, and will serve as a model for other communities around the United States who face similar challenges. 



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