Seidman Cancer Center

Friday, January 13, 2017

UH Seidman Cancer Center receives recognition for cancer care from largest oncology society in United States

CLEVELAND – University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center has been recognized by the QOPI Certification Program (QCP™), an affiliate of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), as successfully completing a three-year certification program for outpatient hematology-oncology practices that meet nationally recognized standards for quality cancer care. QCP builds on ASCO’s Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI®).
 
In applying for Certification, UH Seidman Cancer Center participated in a voluntary comprehensive site assessment against clearly specified standards that are consistent with national guidelines and was successful in meeting the standards and objectives of QCP.
 
“ASCO’s QOPI certification recognizes those oncology practices that are committed to delivering the highest quality of cancer care,” said ASCO President Daniel F. Hayes, MD, FASCO. “By achieving certification, these practices have demonstrated their commitment to quality and safety excellence in the care they deliver to patients, as well as to the continuous process of quality improvement.”


Monday, January 09, 2017

Has the Affordable Care Act Reduced Socioeconomic Disparities in Cancer Screening?

Out-of-pocket expenditures are thought to be a significant barrier to receiving cancer preventive services, especially for individuals of lower socioeconomic status. A new study looks at how the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which eliminated such out-of-pocket expenditures, has affected the use of mammography and colonoscopy. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study found that use of mammography, but not colonoscopy, increased after the ACA.
 
To determine changes in the use of mammography and colonoscopy among fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries before and after the ACA’s implementation, Gregory Cooper, MD, of University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center and the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, and his colleagues examined Medicare claims data, identifying women ≥70 years old without mammography in the previous two years and men and women ≥70 years old at increased risk for colorectal cancer without colonoscopy in the past five years. The team also identified which patients were screened in the two-year period prior to the ACA’s implementation (2009-2010) and after its implementation (2011-September 2012). 


Friday, December 09, 2016

UH Seidman Cancer Center expert to present novel Triple-Negative Breast Cancer immunotherapy trial at 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium

CLEVELAND – A researcher from University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center will discuss his upcoming immunotherapy clinical trial for triple-negative breast cancer at the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. The annual symposium is the premier meeting for more than 7,500 physicians and scientists dedicated to breast cancer treatment, featuring state-of-the-art breast cancer research such as experimental biology, etiology, prevention, diagnosis, and therapy of both breast cancer and premalignant breast disease.  
 
Joseph Baar, MD, PhD, Director of Breast Cancer Research at UH Seidman Cancer Center and Associate Professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, will share details about a phase II clinical trial testing the effectiveness of combining the chemotherapy drugs carboplatin and nab-paclitaxel with an immunotherapeutic agent called pembrolizumab (Keytruda) for use in patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer. Dr. Baar’s poster presentation will be part of the Ongoing Trials-Targeted Therapy session on December 8, 2016 from 5 pm to 7 pm.
 
“Up until now, women with triple-negative breast cancer have only had one treatment option, which is chemotherapy. However, more recently, we’ve seen that the immune modulator pembrolizumab improves outcomes in patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer,” said Dr. Baar. “As a result, it is now critical to explore how the addition of pembrolizumab to chemotherapy might improve  survival in patients with this type of breast cancer.”


Monday, December 05, 2016

Advances in Multiple Myeloma, Lymphoma and other Hematologic Malignancies Presented at Annual Meeting of American Society of Hematology

CLEVELAND – Researchers from University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine presented significant new research findings in multiple myeloma, lymphoma and other hematologic disorders at the 58th Annual Meeting of American Society of Hematology (ASH) in San Diego.  
 
“The breadth and depth of this innovative cancer research presented at ASH is truly outstanding,” says Stan Gerson, MD, Director of UH Seidman Cancer Center and Case Comprehensive Cancer Center at Case Western Reserve. “Our faculty members are making tremendous advances in multiple myeloma, lymphoma and other hematologic malignancies which is reflected in their being selected for oral and poster presentations.”
 
Major advances have been made in treating multiple myeloma (MM) over the last 12 years and early phase clinical trials have played a key role in this progress according to an oral presentation (Abstract #1146) by Ehsan Malek, MD, of UH Seidman Cancer Center. Phase I trials, in addition to moving progress forward for new treatments, also have demonstrated therapeutic success for patients and are well tolerated.


Wednesday, November 09, 2016

UH Seidman Cancer Center performs new image-guided prostate biopsy

CLEVELAND – University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center physicians are among the first in the country to offer a promising new screening tool to detect prostate cancer – MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) - guided prostate biopsy.  Using sophisticated MRI imaging, the technology enables physicians to better visualize and biopsy cancerous cells within the prostate.
 
Performed inside the MRI gantry, this technology enables physicians to distinguish tumors from healthy tissue. Using the advanced MRI images, they are able to then perform a targeted prostate biopsy.
 
“The in-gantry MRI guided biopsy has the potential to revolutionize prostate cancer detection,” says Vikas Gulani, MD, PhD, Director of Magnetic Resonance Imaging at UH Cleveland Medical Center. “The MRI reveals the specific characteristics that distinguish between normal and diseased tissue. Visualizing the tumor’s location within the prostate enables physicians to more accurately target and biopsy the lesion.”



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