Small molecule prevents blood clots without increasing bleeding risk

Friday, June 02, 2017
CLEVELAND – It may be possible to disrupt harmful blood clots in people at risk for heart attack or stroke without increasing their risk of bleeding, according to a new study published in Nature Communications.

The new research out of University Hospitals (UH) Cleveland Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and the Cleveland Clinic reveals a previously unknown cell receptor interaction that, when manipulated with therapeutic molecules, safely prevents blood clots. Approximately 100,000 Americans die annually from blood clots, or thrombosis, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“We have found a new thrombosis target that does not increase bleeding risk,” said senior author Daniel I. Simon, MD, President, UH Cleveland Medical Center, Herman K. Hellerstein Chair of Cardiovascular Research, and Professor of Medicine at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine. “Our discovery indicates that you can identify a new pathway and target that mediates blood clotting, but does not affect our body’s natural processes to stop bleeding, called hemostasis.”

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