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Weinstein accusers similar to child abuse or domestic abuse victims, according to Dr. Lolita McDavid (VIDEO/AUDIO)




CLEVELAND -- The number of women stepping forward with allegations of sexual harassment, impropriety, and misconduct by Harvey Weinstein continues to grow, with dozens now telling their story about the former Hollywood mogul. But after years of alleged abuse, why have the allegations just now started to surface?

"It's like what happens in domestic violence as well as when children are assaulted; people are afraid to come forward," says Lolita McDavid, MD, Medical Director of Child Advocacy and Protection at UH Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital. "Either they're afraid they won't be believed -- because their assailant has often told them nobody's going to believe them -- or the person who's doing this to them is more powerful than they are and they're afraid there's going to be retribution."

Weinstein was a powerful man in Hollywood, producing hundreds of movies, including "sex lies and videotape," "Pulp Fiction," "Shakespeare in Love," "Clerks," and countless others. The sexual misconduct, according to his accusers, went on for years.

"The interesting thing is how many people knew that this was going on," says Dr. McDavid. "This is the same thing we see in child sexual abuse. People will know and they either feel they can keep an eye on things or they don't want to rock the boat or they don't want it out there that this is going on in their family."

Dr. McDavid says the flood of women coming forward is the result of them feeling empowered now that others have told their stories. 


The board of The Weinstein Company (TWC) fired Harvey Weinstein earlier this month. He has now checked into sex rehabilitation in Arizona this week.


Crohn's Study (VIDEO)




CLEVELAND -- "It's a new world," says Mahmoud Ghannoum, PhD, Director, Center for Medical Mycology at University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center. "For many years we never really thought about how important these organisms are in our gut."

Crohn's disease and colitis

Dr. Ghannoum

"We started looking at both bacteria and fungi and that's really where the discovery is. It's not only bacteria that's important but also fungi. In fact, they work together strategically to try cause more issues in the inflamatory process.

"People used to think it's bacteria only. Our studies starting to show it's not only bacteria, it's not only fungus (but) it's really these organisms they come and work together to form what we call digestive plague." That plague or biofilm start to cause issues to our intestinal lining

Diet biofilm antifungal agents probiotics, good fungus and good antibiotics
keep the balance back intestinal lining

"We want to bring this balance back," says Dr. Ghannoum. "A lot of the time, we can't do much about  genetics but we are able to do something bringing harmony to our gut."
interaction between bacteria and fungus

Inflammatory issues, diarhea, pain, 


New SmartCurve Makes Mammography More Comfortable (VIDEO)




CLEVELAND -- Mammograms are an important weapon in the battle against breast cancer but not the most pleasurable. Women have complained about the paddle (the vice-like device that holds the breast in place for the imaging) pinches the skin, digs into the arm pits, and puts pressure on the neck.

University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center is testing a new system called SmartCurve which uses a softer, friendlier paddle.

"It has curved edges, it's much easier for the technologist to use, and the patient prefers it in the studies we've done so far," says Donna Plecha, MD, Director of Radiology and Mammography at University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center. "It just seems more comfortable and the more comfortable we can get the mammogram exam for patients the better and hopefully more patients will have less complaints and more patients will come in for screening mammograms.

Dr. Plecha extols the virtues of early screening for breast cancer, citing research that finds early detection can result in death rates dropping by 40 percent as well as less aggressive and invasive treatments like chemotherapy and radiation.

Other new technologies like 3D mammographies and an abbreviated MRI for women with dense breasts (taking less than 10 minutes) are other advances for early detection, according to Dr. Plecha.

"I think it can be a deterrent," says Dr. Plecha of the current, more inconvenient mammogram devices. "Anything we can do to make it more comfortable to patients and more accessible, the better." She expects the SmartCurve could hit the market as soon as six months.

The American College of Radiology recommends yearly mammographies for women starting at age 40.
 


CHIP Renewal Ohio Senator's Priority as Congress Reconvenes (VIDEO/AUDIO)




CLEVELAND -- Congress reconvenes this week with several top priorities this month, according to Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH): to raise the debt limit, pass a budget, take care of victims of Hurricane Harvey, and insure that CHIP, the Children's Health Insurance Program, gets renewed.

"CHIP funding runs out September thirtieth," says Senator Brown. "It's authorization and reauthorization, meaning keeping it in affect and expanding it and growing it and perfecting it if you can ever do that precisely with health insurance, and making sure all kids have the best possible care is something we should work together on, something that that congress in the past has done."

Senator Brown says for tens of thousands of Ohio children using CHIP, they can see a family doctor instead going to the emergency department for an expensive visit among other things. "It means vaccine and shots, it means dental coverage, it means better treatment if kids get sick, it means better attendance at school," Senator Brown says.

During his confirmation hearings, Senator Brown says he asked Tom Price, President Trump's selection for Secretary of Health and Human Services about CHIP, and Price told the senator he was for the reauthorization of CHIP but didn't answer definitely if he was in favor of keeping the CHIP expansion which came with the Affordable Care Act.

This Thursday, Brown says he expects the Senate Finance Committee to bring up CHIP reauthorization.


U.S. News & World Report Once Again Names University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center Among Nation's Best Hospitals (VIDEO)




CLEVELAND -- University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center once again has been recognized as one of the nation's best hospitals for 2017–18 by U.S. News & World Report. UH Cleveland Medical Center was named among the country’s Top 50 in eight methodology-ranked specialties. The annual U.S. News Best Hospitals rankings recognize hospitals that excel in treating patients with the most challenging conditions.
 
UH Cleveland Medical Center is ranked among the nation’s Top 50 in: Cancer; Ear, Nose & Throat; Gastroenterology and GI Surgery; Geriatrics; Gynecology; Nephrology; Neurology & Neurosurgery, and Orthopedics. These results place UH in the top 1 percent of the nation’s 4,500 hospitals eligible for ranking this year.

UH also received rankings of high performing in eight Common Adult Procedure and Condition Ratings for patients 65 and older: Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair; Aortic Valve Surgery; Heart Bypas Surgery; Heart Failure; Colon Cancer Surgery; Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD); Knee Replacement; and Lung Cancer Surgery.

In July, U.S. News & World Report ranked UH Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital among America's Best Children's Hospitals in nine pediatric specialties, including #7 in Neonatology. Eight other pediatric specialties at UH Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital were also ranked.


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