University Circle: Aiming for a Cardiac Arrest-Free Zone

CLEVELAND – Feb. 4, 2020 – University Hospitals (UH) Cleveland Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) will train thousands more people to better respond during medical emergencies in University Circle.

More than 356,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur annually in the United States. Sudden cardiac arrest is an electrical disturbance in the heart and different from a heart attack. It often hits with no warning and nearly 90% of cases are fatal. Immediate CPR by a bystander and defibrillation with an AED greatly increase a person’s chance of survival.

From Feb. 1 through March 31, UH and CWRU will offer free pediatric and adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), automated external defibrillator (AED) and Stop the Bleed training for CWRU faculty, staff and students. Certified instructors from UH and CWRU EMS and the Division of Public Safety will teach the classes.

“Survival of cardiac arrest is possible, but only with fast, appropriate medical care,” said Daniel I. Simon, MD, President, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, and UH Chief Clinical and Scientific Officer. “We believe we will save lives with education and training, and American Heart Month is the perfect time to draw attention to this critical need.”

This initiative will also improve local access to AEDs by placing one in each building on the CWRU campus.

“The program is a partnership between UH and CWRU to better prepare not only our campus but our partners in University Circle for possible medical emergencies,” said Megan Koeth, Case Western Reserve's assistant director for Emergency Management. “This training will benefit participants while at work and at home.”

Organizers of the campaign have made it their goal to train 3,000 community members during this first push, with plans for continuous training in the future. You can request a class for your group by emailing publicsafety@case.edu. To register for a scheduled class, please visit case.edu/publicsafety.